14 Jul 2010

Today’s poster is for the variety of HTTP status codes which exist. Not only is there the 34 original HTTP v1.0 ones and the 6 new ones that came in with 1.1. There is also another 10 extensions from official RFC’s, and two special case ones. That is 52 in total, and it isn’t easy to remember what they are all are – so this poster is a cheat sheet to help with that.

It is also related to my other REST cheat sheet, since good HTTP status code usage is important for good REST services.

RestCheatSheet2

You can download the high resolution XPS file below.

AttachmentSize
File RestCheatSheet2.xps2.38 MB
PDF icon CheatSheet.pdf1.45 MB

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 Twitter Trackbacks for HTTP Status Codes Cheat Sheet | SADe's picture

[...] HTTP Status Codes Cheat Sheet | SADev sadev.co.za/content/http-status-codes-cheat-sheet – view page – cached Today’s poster is for the variety of HTTP status codes which exist. Not only is there the 34 original HTTP v1.0 ones and the 6 new ones that came in with 1.1. There is also another 10 extensions from official RFC’s, and two special case ones. That is 52 in total, and it isn’t easy to remember what they are all are – so this poster is a cheat sheet to help with that. It is also related to... Read moreToday’s poster is for the variety of HTTP status codes which exist. Not only is there the 34 original HTTP v1.0 ones and the 6 new ones that came in with 1.1. There is also another 10 extensions from official RFC’s, and two special case ones. That is 52 in total, and it isn’t easy to remember what they are all are – so this poster is a cheat sheet to help with that. It is also related to my other REST cheat sheet, since good HTTP status code usage is important for good REST services. You can download the high resolution XPS file below., HTTP Status Codes Cheat Sheet View page Tweets about this link [...]

Zoran Rilak's picture

XPS? Seriously? What's wrong with PDF?

I'll leave my impressions on the actual content as soon as I manage to convert the file to PDF. The reference looks nice and usable.

Robert MacLean's picture

I've uploaded a PDF version.
There is a lot wrong with PDF from a technophile perspective:
  1. You need special software to open it. The standard is Adobe PDF Reader which is horrid, personally I use FoxIt Reader but that is because I care about that. Most people don't and so will be forced to install bad software. If you have any modern version of Windows XPS can be opened natively.
  2. PDF is a closed format controlled by one company, XPS is an open standard.
  3. As a .NET developer I can work with XPS easily. The number of nights of lost sleep because of PDF being a product requirement are thankfully long gone.
Sure PDF can do a lot more, especially the new document features in v9+ but the reality is most people want a format that
  1. Will always render the same
  2. Can't be changed
  3. Prints the same as it is on the screen
In this PDF and XPS are a tie.

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